Resistor

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Resistor is an electronic element that can limit the branch current. A fixed resistor is a kind of resistor whose resistance cannot be changed, while that of a potentiometer or a variable resistor can be adjusted.

Two generally used circuit symbols for resistor. Normally, the resistance is marked on it. So if you see these symbols in a circuit, it stands for a resistor.

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Ω is the unit of resistance and the larger units include KΩ, MΩ, etc. Their relationship can be shown as follows: 1 MΩ=1000 KΩ, 1 KΩ = 1000 Ω. Normally, the value of resistance is marked on it.

When using a resistor, we need to know its resistance first. Here are two methods: you can observe the bands on the resistor, or use a multimeter to measure the resistance. You are recommended to use the first method as it is more convenient and faster.

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As shown in the card, each color stands for a number.

Black

Brown

Red

Orange

Yellow

Green

Blue

Violet

Grey

White

Gold

Silver

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

0.1

0.01

The 4- and 5-band resistors are frequently used, on which there are 4 and 5 chromatic bands.

Normally, when you get a resistor, you may find it hard to decide which end to start for reading the color. The tip is that the gap between the 4th and 5th band will be comparatively larger.

Therefore, you can observe the gap between the two chromatic bands at one end of the resistor; if it’s larger than any other band gaps, then you can read from the opposite side.

Let’s see how to read the resistance value of a 5-band resistor as shown below.

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So for this resistor, the resistance should be read from left to right. The value should be in this format: 1st Band 2nd Band 3rd Band x 10^Multiplier (Ω) and the permissible error is ±Tolerance%. So the resistance value of this resistor is 2(red) 2(red) 0(black) x 10^0(black) Ω = 220 Ω, and the permissible error is ± 1% (brown).

You can learn more about resistor from Wiki: Resistor - Wikipedia.